sigabrt
Map Meme


visited 29 states (58%)
Create your own visited map of The United States

I’ll give you one guess which part of the U.S. I think we could do without.

mutt, procmail, maildir and indexing, oh my.

As a long-time *nix user, I’ve used mutt as my email client for more than a decade (I switched from elm, because it had a y2k issue; yes, really!), reading mail stored locally via fetchmail(1) and procmail(1). I initially set things up this way back in the days when network connectivity was not nearly as ubiquitous as it is now, and it was useful to continue to read and compose emails while offline.

For a long time, I stored my mail folders in mbox format because that was easiest. I did (and still do) some quirky monthly mailboxes for email lists (like LKML) that got too much mail, as mutt takes a long time to open an mbox with upwards of 20,000 messages (about two months worth of LKML traffic, give or take). I saw recommendations from others to switch to MailDir format, but my initial experiments showed that mutt handled large MailDir mailboxes even more slowly, so I stuck with mbox.

However, I finally got around to setting up an automated backup scheme with rsnapshot(1), essentially a wrapper around rsync(1). It sets things up so that files that don’t change between backup runs are hardlinked together, significantly saving space in the backup archive. In such a scheme, mbox files are a bad idea, because each time the mail folder changes, an additional copy of the mailbox is stored on the archive media. MailDir, with each message stored as an individual file, is much friendlier to this scheme, as most of the messages in the folder won’t change. There is a downside, I use more storage locally, but the space savings on my archive media is significant enough that I converted many of my mail folders.

As you might imagine, solving the performance issue when opening a large folder was pretty important. The issue was the mutt was opening each of the MailDir message files to get the header information for displaying the folder contents. Obviously, an index would be useful, and mutt can use one. All one needs to do is add something like

set header_cache="~/Mail/.cache/"

to your .muttrc, and like magic, opening mail folders is much quicker.

One quirk did arise when I made this conversion; when mutt displays a mail folder, it can show you the number of lines in each message, giving an indication of the size of each message. Unfortunately, when viewing my MailDir folders, all the messages were showing a size of 0. The issue is that mutt relies on the Lines: header to be set which most clients don’t set, and thus procmail couldn’t add the field to the header index. The solution, of course, is more procmail magic. The mutt MailDir wiki page helpfully has the following procmailrc snippet:

# MAILDIR LINES
# Add Lines header for mutt with Maildirs.
# Mutt shows lines based on Lines header.
# We have to do this manually for Maildir
# delivered messages.
:0 BWfh
* H ?? !^Lines:
* -1^0
*  1^1 ^.*$
| formail -A "Lines: $="

which calculates the number of lines in the message body and adds it to the message’s headers (using formail). Once that’s done, procmail adds the Lines: header to the index, and mutt stops reporting all messages as being 0 sized. Hooray!

winkchin:

guillee:

New York City’s major crime rate fell 5.1 percent in 2009, and its 471 murders represented an annual decline of 9.9 percent compared with the national average of 7.2 percent, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said.

FBI crime data showed that of the 25 largest U.S. cities New York recorded 2,242 “index crimes” of murder, rape, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny and auto theft for every 100,000 residents, the mayor’s office said today in a news release. San Jose, California, was ranked second with 2,746 such crimes per 100,000, and San Diego third, with 2,903 per 100,000.

I am feeling a sudden urge to visit New York.

If you’re looking for safety, I’d go with San Jose or San Diego. NYC likely got it’s #1 ranking because the police there were heavily pressured to underreport major crimes in order to look safer:

http://www.villagevoice.com/2010-05-04/news/the-nypd-tapes-inside-bed-stuy-s-81st-precinct/

See also: http://nypdconfidential.com/

BTW, wonkette has completely figured out why crime stats are dropping across the U.S. despite high unemployment and all the other deritrus of our failed economy — it’s because we’re too fat.

onethingwell:


Tig is a git repository browser that additionally can act as a pager for output from various git commands. When browsing repositories, it uses the underlying git commands to present the user with various views, such as summarized revision log and showing the commit with the log message, diffstat, and the diff.

A happy medium between the command line and one of the many full-blown GUI frontends to git.

Nice!

onethingwell:

Tig is a git repository browser that additionally can act as a pager for output from various git commands. When browsing repositories, it uses the underlying git commands to present the user with various views, such as summarized revision log and showing the commit with the log message, diffstat, and the diff.

A happy medium between the command line and one of the many full-blown GUI frontends to git.

Nice!

NeatX and QtNX

[I doubt my google juice here is enough to make this show up for anyone’s searches but what the hell, I’ll document it here anyway.]

For some reason, the vnc servers in lucid seem broken. vnc4server suffers from bug 556147, for which I created a fix for, but even with that, it seems to treat the Super key (usually mapped to the Windows key) as always on, which triggers a bunch of shortcuts and makes it useless to actually do anything in. tightvnc4server has completely garbled input and crashed after about 5 seconds of typing (bug 556222). Sigh.

Thus I thought I’d give google’s neatx another try. It installs from the launchpad PPA just fine, but the only client I can seem to find included in the ubuntu archive is qtnx, and trying to get it work with neatx would cause it to appear to just hang. The secret is that qtnx only supports version 3.0.0 of the nx protocol, whereas neatx defaults to 3.3.0 support. But if you edit /etc/neatx.conf and tell it to use

nx-protocol-version = 3.0.0

then qtnx works just fine with it. Well, until the next upload of neatx or qtnx, when surely they’ll break again.

Update:

And it seems that either the nx clients I’ve tried or the neatx server doesn’t want to pass along right-ctrl to windows in the session… which works really poorly with virtualbox, as right-ctrl is the default “escape from the guest” key. Argh!

It also looks like the Super key may be an interaction issue between Xvnc4 and gnome-session, as running blackbox inside of vnc doesn’t seem to have the same issue. But it may just be that there are no hotkey mappings that use the Super key in my blackbox setup. Super!

The greatest reason of all is wink.

winkchin:

My results from Sloganmaker.

Because I have had way too many discussions on the topic with my 6yo and 4yo kids, I spent 5 minutes reloading this search and giggling to myself. Yes, I am easily amused.

(s)tumbling to failure.

winkchin:

sbeattie:

That said, I still don’t think I’m doing it right, given that I haven’t seen my initial response show up as a comment or reference off of your original post.

Your reblog shows under the “n notes”  under my post. At least it shows up for me—let me know if it isn’t showing up for you.

Here’s a screenshot of what http://winkchin.tumblr.com/post/358705967/s-tumbling-to-failure looks like here, which is what I responded to:

I don’t see my response as a note on your post. I *do* see my notes where someone else has posted a note. *shrug*

(s)tumbling to failure.

winkchin:

sbeattie:

I’m pretty sure I don’t get this tumblr thing. But then, walled garden blog environments have always felt a little odd to me.

Well, one approach is this: http://www.rinich.com/post/358597818/i-love-walled-gardens

The thing to remember about the iPad as a device (and others of it’s ilk) is that it’s geared for consumption, not creation, which is fine as long as devices geared for creation are available. Heck, Archos and others are bringing out android based devices that look really tempting to me; the platform being of interest to me so that I can treat it as a closed, polished device if I want, but if I feel like hacking on it, it’s still open to me.

So fine, that non-walled blogging platforms exist is great and all, but if you are in your garden, I have to join or choose to not participate in your conversations. See below why I actually bothered to sign up with tumblr. So I don’t see the analogy to the closed nature of an iPad; that you choose to use a closed device like your iPod Touch has little impact on me other than that I can’t play scrabble-clone games with you (and I’m not even sure that’s true).

But what I’d really say is that Tumblr is no more a walled garden than Twitter. Indeed, I see Tumblr as multi-media long-form Twitter: reblogs = retweets; likes = favorites; the follow, following structure is the same; etc.

FYI, Twitter has lost a lot of its interest to me with its reply policy change, because I can no longer see one-sided conversations and jump in if you are talking to someone I don’t follow about a topic I might have something to say about. Unfortunately, identi.ca made some change to its api that none of the clients I’ve tried is able to parse, but if they were working, that’s where I’d spend the majority of my social media focus.

Combine the similarities to Twitter with the fact that the people I like to follow most on Twitter have also taken up residence in Tumblr…well, there’s a reason they’re called “social networks”, right?

The reason I’ve followed you onto tumblr is primarily because I really, really wanted to comment on your picky eater post, and couldn’t find a way to do so that didn’t involve registering for an account and associated blog. Alas, I didn’t stick to my principles, caved, and am helping tumblr gain content. Sigh.

That said, I still don’t think I’m doing it right, given that I haven’t seen my initial response show up as a comment or reference off of your original post.

Hrm, I may have to look at getting one of these.

(s)tumbling to failure.

I’m pretty sure I don’t get this tumblr thing. But then, walled garden blog environments have always felt a little odd to me.